What are you currently reading?

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
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"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
Finally I got to System Collapse, which was good but I have to say not as good as the previous ones. Then I read A Demon's Guide to Wooing a Witch, which as you can imagine from the title was not high intellectual reading but it was fun. Yesterday I started Material World, a non-fiction about the six most important and basic materials we need in the world, it's fascinating.
And that's all for this year so far. Last year I read 45 books fewer than in 2022 and I have no idea why? Probably more huge books and less re-reading of fun series. Plus I watched a lot of TV last year.
 

PetiteSheWolf

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Alchemist from France
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I've been reading The Silent Corner by Dean Koontz. Took a bit of time off for awhile when my work got crazy busy for me, but try to get a chapter a day in.
Tell us how you like it? I loved the "Odd Thomas" serie, and his "A big little life" (about his relationship with his dog Trixie), in a very different style, is really sweet.
 

MadamMeow

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Fae from Central NJ
Posts: 643
"I see my vision burn, I feel my memories fade with time, but Im too young to worry..."
Tell us how you like it? I loved the "Odd Thomas" serie, and his "A big little life" (about his relationship with his dog Trixie), in a very different style, is really sweet.

I really like it so far! I'm still before the halfway point, but it's pretty action packed and suspenseful.

I really like this author. Have not read one by him in a long time, but he was my first boyfriend/husband's fav author so I used to like to read some of his collection. The Bad Place was probably my favorite.

Thanks for the tip on the others, I'll have to look into them. :ss:
 

Madlen

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Honeybee from Germany
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I finished the first book of the year (and one audiobook) . Now I'm reading "The Secret of Chimneys" by Agatha Christie.
 

AquaMarie

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Paladin from Texas, USA
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Posts: 123
"If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water."
Library's book: All Our Hidden Gifts by Caroline O'Donoghue. I've recently gotten interested in tarot, so this one caught my eye. I'm really enjoying it so far, even if it is a little creepier than I was expecting. I love the drawings of the deck the character is using - it's supposed to be from the 60s/70s, so it's super groovy :LOL:.

My book: Izzy at the End of the World by K. A. Reynolds. I've read about 50 pages and I'm already in love with this girl and how much she loves her dog.
 
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Niika

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Posts: 49
@Anek I am on a waiting list for the audiobook of System Collapse! I think the shorter stories are stronger than the novels overall, but I won't say no to more time with MurderBot.
 

Syrius

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Valkyrie from The Sonoran Desert
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"Energy and persistence conquers all things. -Benjamin Franklin"
Book for my 3-week class: Never Give In - The Extraordinary Character of Winston Churchill by Stephen Mansfield
Book for fun: Dinosaur Planet Survivors by Anne McCaffrey
 

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
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Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
@Niika there are short stories??!?? Please point me in their direction!!
 

Deadoks

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Viking from Belgium
Posts: 705
"Berserker"
I would love to read... I have the first book of "game of thrones" near my bed for 2 month... But whatever it's still untouched.
I'll put this soon in a routine!
 

AquaMarie

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Paladin from Texas, USA
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Posts: 123
"If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water."
Non-fiction: Dare to Repair Your Car by Julie Sussman and Stephanie Glakas-Tenet. It's pretty old and more about maintenance and good practices than repair, really. There's lots of good information about how a car works and what a non-mechanic realistically can and can't do. It's written in plain language but not dumbed down, so I'm really enjoying it so far.

Fiction: What You Are Looking For Is In the Library by Michiko Aoyama, translated by Alison Watts. I will say that the blurb makes it sound more of a fantasy than it really is - I guess to hook folks that really liked Before the Coffee Gets Cold. It's a fun book, though, written in the same format as Coffee, and since it's like a series of short stories I can dip in and out of it when I only have a few minutes to read.
 

Niika

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Jedi from United States
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Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
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Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
@Niika ahhhh, ok, I see what you mean - I've read all those, I thought there were other short stories somewhere. But I agree with you, they could be considered novellas.
 

Jaga

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Posts: 56
"I don’t have a soul. I am a soul. I have a body."
Currently I'm listening to Unseen by Karin Slaughter, Why We Eat (Too Much) by Andrew Jenkinson.
Unfortunately I didn't really have time to read recently, and I'm desperately trying to pass all my school-stuff & exams, so I can again read something, that is not school-related.
 

MolBren

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Jedi Pronouns: she/her
Posts: 64
"newbie"
I love seeing people enjoying Murderbot! I am behind on the series, but what I've read so far has been entertaining.
I'm listening to a non-fiction audiobook about space called Under Alien Skies during my daily walks. It is set up a bit like a travel book and talks about what it would be like if we could be a tourist to the moon, to Jupiter, Pluto, etc. It feels like exercise for my brain while getting fresh air.
 

Xyneth

Member
Priestess Posts: 5
Non-fiction: The Origin of Species - Charles Darwin. Classic!
Fiction (audiobook): The Storm We Made - Vanessa Chan. A historical fiction when Japan occupied Malaysia.

My next reads are The Hundred Years' War on Palestine by Rashid Khalidi and The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu.
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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Posts: 429
"I sing and I know things"
I just finished rereading Bullshit Jobs by David Graeber (I wish he were still with us to write more of these insightful books).

I would like to make it through some more of my unread books this year.
I will try The Enigma of Capital and the Crises of Capitalism by David Harvey.

A while ago I watched a video of someone speeddating her books, I think I should try that as well :p
 

AquaMarie

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Paladin from Texas, USA
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Posts: 123
"If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water."
My book: The Mimicking of Known Sucesses by Malka Ann Older. I love mysteries that are set on other planets! :excited: And right now that title could be referencing a few different things, so I'm excited to see if there's a title call in the book and what it will refer to. :LOL:

Library's book: Witchsign by Den Patrick. It's not bad, but I'm kinda hoping a dragon shows up to pick up the pace a little bit at this point.
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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"I sing and I know things"
I actually decided to be brave and started on The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace Wells.
Yep, it's quite depressing, but at least it's super well-written and somewhat sassy ^^
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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Posts: 429
"I sing and I know things"
I have finished The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells.
It is indeed a rather depressing topic, but also very well written and therefore much easier to get through than I expected.
And I guess forewarned is forearmed.

I then relaxed by re-reading A Psalm for the Wild-Built by Becky Chambers.
It's a beautiful short sci-fi novel that falls firmly in the realm of SolarPunk.
It gives me many wholesome feels =)

And I just finished Collapse Feminism by Alice Capelle.
It's an interesting exploration of struggles in social progression mediated by the internet.
Luckily it ends with some suggestions of how we can work towards a kinder future.
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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Posts: 429
"I sing and I know things"
I finished Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl.
It is an interesting read, and I get why a lot of people find it a very powerful book.
I think it wasn't quite as horizon-widening for me as for most, I think I already had to learn some of these things by disability xD
 

MolBren

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Posts: 64
"newbie"
I finished the travel guide through the cosmos and am now listening to a cozy murder mystery set in London in 1900 called Murder at the Picadilly Playhouse which adds some entertainment to my walks at lunchtime.

I've also been inspired (re-inspired) to get back to the Murderbot series, so have checked out Fugitive Telemetry from the library and plan to start it tonight.
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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Posts: 429
"I sing and I know things"
I finished reading "It's not that Radical" by Mikaela Loach, which was a delightfully intersectional and non-depressing look a the climate crisis.

I am now about halfway through "Losing Eden" by Lucy Jones. It's truly fascinating how much our minds and bodies are positively influenced by nature. I think I will be making use of quite a few things I learned in this book.
 

MolBren

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Jedi Pronouns: she/her
Posts: 64
"newbie"
I'm reading The 1619 Project in honor of Black History Month. I've read some of the essays before, but never the whole thing. I like the way it's organized with poetry interspersed between chapters. And it's quite illuminating, I'm learning a lot.
 

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
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Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
I'm really enjoying the book I'm reading: Bookshops&Bonedust. So fun! I'm loving the characters and the story!

Much better than the previous one, which I declared dnf after 3 chapters, Thrive. It's book 5 (I think) of a series of 10, which I didn't know when I bought it. I guess it can be read as stand alone but the characters were really ugh and the writing was worse. No thanks. Once upon a time I would have finished because no book will be left behind, but there's no time for that anymore.
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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Posts: 429
"I sing and I know things"
I finished Losing Eden and it's an amazing book!
There are sections in this that I have already been telling friends about, because they are so interesting =D
There are bacterial in healthy soils that cause your body's immune response to release serotonin!
Being in nature areas can help soothe struggles with ADHD!
For what was technically a 'climate book,' this one mostly just let me marvel at the world and how we fit into it <3

I've now started The Fifth Season by N K Jemesin. It's a fantasy book, and whooh boy did it start of darker than I anticipated.
The writing is very good though.
 

PetiteSheWolf

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Alchemist from France
Posts: 1,502
Forgot to update here! My more recent reads that I can remember are
  • "The cathedral of the sea", by Ildefonso Falcones (French version). About the construction of this cathedral in Barcelona, in the 14th century , seen from the eyes of a serf / worker, it is well written, very well documented. But a hard, very hard read. I had to stop at about 1/3 because I can take in only so much misery - sorry, yeah, I know, but book reading is mostly my evening relaxation and thhis was turning not so. So gave it back to my dad, who had lent to to me. If you have a strong stomach, I recommend. If not , yeah, avoid.
  • "The maid" by Nyta Prose. A murder mystery in an upscale hotel, narrated by a maid at the hotel, who's clearly some different ways to perceive things, very litteraly, not good at human relationship. Well... not bad, but too cutesy for my taste (I think our young crowd says "twee" ?) ; and I got the irksome feeling that Molly's difference was not presented in a coherent fashion through the book - sometimes she doesn't get things happening around her, but a harder thing will be well interpreted. Read until the end, but wouldn't necessarily recommend it.
Note : it has been twice I have read a book that was in Goodreads's "top of the year" list, "the maid" (winner for "best mystery and thriller") and "where the lost wander" (nominee for historical fiction - sorry but it was so bad I put only one star) that are quite disappointing. Hmmm. For the rest, I like reading other people's reviews and comments on goodreads, but looks like I, personally - as it is after all a question of personal taste - shouldn't lean too much on their yearly nomination and award system.
 

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
Pronouns: She/her
Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
@Maegaranthelas I loved The Fifth Season! I hope you enjoy it too!

I finished Bookshops & Bonedust and immediately ordered the next one, which is actually the first one he wrote. I know, I know, I had promised I would not buy new books until half of my to-read shelf was empty, but...

I started The Housemaid, which is so far very catching. I hope it won't disappoint!
 

Maegaranthelas

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Bard from The Netherlands
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Posts: 429
"I sing and I know things"
@Anek I loved The Fifth Season too! It was almost impossible to put down. I will definitely need to read the next books to find out how the story continues. So good!

Last night and today I powered through Fowl Eulogies by Lucie Rico, a fiction book about... chickens? It's incredibly weird.
I understand why it won prizes, but I also don't know if I actually enjoyed reading it...
 

AquaMarie

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Paladin from Texas, USA
Pronouns: she/her
Posts: 123
"If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water."
Into the Bright Open: A Secret Garden Remix by Cherie Dimaline. I'm not terribly far into it (about 15%), but so far all that's been 'mixed' is setting and protagonist genders. Oh, and some romantic awakening and (very obvious) family stuff. :sad: I'm a little disappointed, actually; I don't really like the whole romantic longing thing, and I was hoping it would diverge a bit more in tone from The Secret Garden. I'm going to give it another 10% or so before I decide whether to DNF it or not.
 

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
Pronouns: She/her
Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
The Housemaid was really good! I didn't see it coming, the only obvious thing for me was Evelyn.

Now a James Patterson to make space in the shelf
 

AquaMarie

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Paladin from Texas, USA
Pronouns: she/her
Posts: 123
"If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water."
What We Harvest by Ann Fraistat - zombies + alchemy! :loveit: It's gotten a little body horror-y at times, which, ick, but it has definitely kept me guessing. I'm really enjoying it!

The Tatami Galaxy by Tomihiko Morimi - I'm about 8% into this one, not really gotten into the meat of it yet. The main character is, well, yikes, at this point. He's walking the thin line between charming unreliable narrator and too annoying to put up with. I'll give the book another 12% before I decide whether I finish it or not. We'll see!
 

Sharoumane

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Scout from Paris, France
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Posts: 40
"Step by step in all things"
I'm a webtoon binger, hope this qualifies haha

Just finished Cursed Princess Club which was a superb support during my recent surgery journey. It's medieval fantasy/fairy tale about friendships, family, body dysmorphia and, most importantly, the many loves we develop in our lives, including self-love.
Currently obsessed with Muse on Fame's cutthroat writing and nihilist take on acting, while Odd Girl Out echoes the themes of CPC in a real-world setting and with a focus not on self-image but on how teenage friendships build us. Also with female leads is Magic School Girl: Spare no Villains, which is absurdly hilarious with grand shonen moments of obliterating demons with the power of friendship, and my all-time favourite Space Boy: a scifi slow-pace thriller with a deep, deep understanding of what makes a human. The latter is nearing its finish line.
For male-led stories, I enjoy the classic returner of My S-Class Hunters as the powers are interesting and not a re-hash of isekai tropes (although we still have dungeons and ranks and all that jazz), and my favourite male leads are the two from Castle Swimmer. It's got a wonderful lore and story, with a cast made entirely of merfolks, and touches upon trauma (physical/mental) with great care and cathartic scenes. Made me want to learn to swim.
(If you want raw trauma head for Suitor Armor.)
 

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
Pronouns: She/her
Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
I wanted to start Nona the Ninth today, but when I picked it up I realized that it's book three of a series. I got inspired by someone here to get this, can anyone tell me if it makes sense to read it as a stand alone, or if I should get books one and two first? Thanks!!!
 

Andi64

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from Margareten
Posts: 103
@Anek I read all three and would strongly advise against reading Nona. You could read the first chapters, but then it starts referencing people and stuff from the previous books. It's a pretty wild universe and I had problems sometimes getting the cast right in Nona, because it's been a while since Harrow.
Start with Gideon, then you'll want to read Harrow anyway and after that you are glad you already bought Nona. The closer together, the better. Otherwise you are just confused most of the time. And that would be a shame, because they are well written and fun (in the right order).
 
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Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
Pronouns: She/her
Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
@Andi64 thanks! Ok I will get the other two first. It's good that I'm on vacation!
And, happy birthday!!
 
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PetiteSheWolf

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Alchemist from France
Posts: 1,502
last reads:

"The anomalie" (French version, VO, "l'anomalie") by Hervé le Tellier - had the 2020 Goncoourt price, I think. Handed to me by Darling Bro no. 2. Very interesting premise - a Paris / NY flight is taken into a strange storm, and emerge back .... 3 months later. Except they have also landed normally in the normal time - so they're like "clones". How can people deal with doubles of themselves that have , in these three months, experienced things sometimes life- changing? What happened, what are the physical, philosophical implications? The problem, IMO, is that the writer tried to make too much - too much science, too much philosophy, way too many characters (and yet I like choral books), so the themes don't get digged enough, and the characters not attaching enough. great premise, but lost opportunity.

"Les mémoires d'un chat" (a cat's diaries) by Hiro Harikawa, French version. that one was a surprise from my parents. They didn't realise quite what they got me, I think... A young man from Tokyo, Saturo, is searching for reasons undisclosed a new house for his beloved cat, Nana, a former stray whose life Satoru saved when young Nana was wrecked by a car. So, for his cat, Saturo drives through Japan to meet former acquaintances - occasion to learn different parts of Satoru's past, see different parts of japan, and occasions for Nana and Satoru to leave things a bit better afterwards. A good part of the book is in Nana's voice and POV, a very credible streetcat voice - opiniated, stubborn, independant, proud, but also deeply bonded to his Satoru. Rest is in the different acquaintances's POVs. Writing is really excellent. But big warning : yeah, this is a sad, very sad book.
Turns out (you can guess it pretty soon but it is confirmed midway) that Satoru has an incurable cancer, hence his need to rehome Nana before he dies. And the end, well... yeah. I bawled out. Guess I was very partial too it for also personal reasons. When my heart discompensated in November 19, one of my main worries was Mademoiselle Luna and what would become of her, as I had absolutely NOT planned anything. I have, since, but I can so relate to Satoru's quest, and his deep bond with Nana.
Very sad, but also heartwarming as it is a testament to kindness, friendship and empathy, and to our special bonds with our pets. I loved that book.

Last but not least, "the brutal telling" by Louise Penny, in the Chief Inspector Gamache serie. I am back (nearly) full circle since I started with the following tome, "bury your dead". Gotta say, I love this serie - the characters are so well described, and Gamache a very arresting, very humane, well thought out investigator. Even crazy ol'Ruth got me this time with her duck Rosa flying away at the end. No inner police turmoil shenanigans in that tome, but preparation clearly for the next tome with another thread. So now I see how he arrived to "bury your dead" and the incomplete investigation in Three Pines. Now rereading "bury your dead" to better appreciate the characters!
 

AquaMarie

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Paladin from Texas, USA
Pronouns: she/her
Posts: 123
"If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water."
The Monk in the Garden by Robin Marantz Henig - a narrative non-fiction about Gregor Mendel. It's more history than narrative, honestly, and it looks as much at Mendel's contemporaries as Mendel himself. I love scientific history, and genetics was one of my favorite subjects, so I'm really enjoying it.

Nettle & Bone by T. Kingfisher - if I had to describe this one, I'd call it a macabre fairy-tale. It has some horror elements (the Toothdancer scene gives me the crawling heebie-jeebies every time), but it's still very hopeful. As creepy as it can be, it is one of my comfort reads. :LOL: (oh, and the Goodreads blurb does NOT do it justice - the tone of the book is definitely not 'epic fantasy quest,' thank you very much :twitch:)
 

Anek

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Sorceress from Bavaria, Germany
Pronouns: She/her
Posts: 2,241
"If the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember Cedric Diggory."
I finished "The Ink Black Heart" the other day and I really really enjoyed it. I had started to read the first one of this detective years ago and didn't like it and gave it up, but this one was really excellent.

Currently on Gideon the Ninth, it's not easy to get into the world but it's beginning to make some sense. I remember when I read the Fifth Season trilogy I had a hard time getting into the world too, and then I loved it, so high hopes for this one too.
 
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