Question about my weekly routine

Ralad72

Member
Assassin from Czech Republic
Posts: 10
"Nothing is true, everything is permitted."
I have a question regardless my routine.
I like to run 3 times a week and working out 3 times a week (bodyweight workouts from DAREBEE that last maximum 30 minutes).
I would like to ask if it's better to do split routine (arms, abs, legs) or full body workouts, or maybe 2 full body and 1 with focus on arms? or maybe alternate between full body week and a split routine week?
Also is it better, or can I do the workout and running on the same day? If yes should I run or workout first?

Thank you very much.

P.S. I have this bad quality of overthinking everything, which leads to feeling bad about it and end up in doing nothing. So if anyone has any tips wha to do with this, I would be very glad.
 

TopNotch

Well-known member
Ranger from Australia
Posts: 1,780
"Motivation is temporary. Discipline is forever."
One question you must ask yourself is: what is your aim? What is it you are wanting to achieve?
The body is an adaptive machine. When you demand something of it, it will do its best to giv it to you, but it'll take time (as we all know). So if you want it to be able to run, you run and rest and the body works at getting better at running. If you want to build strength, then the body will work on that. If you do both on the same day, then the body will work on adapting to the demands you placed on it last, unless there was quite a period of time between the two workouts (i.e. running in the morning, strength in the evening).
If you can, I would recommend you run on days when you don't do your strength training. If this is not possible, leave as much time as you can between those workouts, and it won't matter which one you do first. The time between, allowing for that body adaptation and recovery, is the important thing.
As far as how you split your strength training; I like a split routine, but sometimes I like to focus on one bit of me that I feel needs particular attention. Again, this is largely your choice and is determined by your aims.

Quite some time ago, during an AMA, I asked a similar sort of questions of @Damer and here is some of the answer:

"This, then leads us to your question: How often should we train and what kind of gap between each type of training are we looking at? Obviously, as you suggest also, part of the answer depends on the level of fitness of the individual. But if we assume that this is not the issue then the gap between training sessions will depend on the intensity of the session itself. Suppose, I run 10km in the morning at 40min flat. And then in the evening I do weights to failure. The chances are that A. I will be too tired in the evening by my super-fast morning run to do much and B. The interval I have left for recovery between the two training sessions is insufficient if I did the time I did in 10km.
A study that dates back to 2008 suggests that there is a ceiling to intensity beyond which no further benefits can be derived. So, if you train for an hour flat-out then upping that to two hours will certainly tire you out but it will not give you twice the benefit you expect. This ceiling to intensity gives us an idea of recovery-time windows. So, if you were to run (for cardiovascular fitness) in the morning you could do strength training in the evening and still get benefits from both forms of activity provided that A. Your running was not super-intense and B. You had plenty of food and 'rest' before you got to the second session. Remember this is all about energy management. That study suggested that 2 - 3 times a week strength training with running in between (or the reverse) produced good results for both.

This interval can be significantly reduced if the workout intensity is lowered. A 2018 study where the workout intensity was constant showed that even when the training is specific (i.e. only strength or only cardiovascular fitness) the inadequate rest leads to decrease in performance not an increase. This had also come up in an earlier study that looked at strength training in older adults and found that two-three times a week was more effective at building strength than say, ever day. So adequate rest is important and/or as we often do with Darebee programs, we vary the intensity from one day to the next and reduce it to minimal levels during "active rest" days so that you can keep on gaining day after day.

Finally, the last part of your question is a variation of the first half. If we throw more goals in the mix: train at the same time for speed, strength, endurance etc what will happen? Well, without sports or movement specificities in mind we end up achieving little of what we expect as our body faces competing demands for the energy necessary to power the adaptations we seek. If we are sports-specific however (football, rugbly, martial arts) then the training we do is geared to that and it doesn't matter a lot if we pack everything in. The chances are that we are training hardest for what is most important in the sport and no sport demands 100% output in every physical attribute. Martial Arts, for instance, demands we are flexible, fast and strong but flexibility and speed trump strength (because it's power that counts) so we end up doing less strength-orientated exercises anyway. "

I hope this helps.
 

Ralad72

Member
Assassin from Czech Republic
Posts: 10
"Nothing is true, everything is permitted."
One question you must ask yourself is: what is your aim? What is it you are wanting to achieve?
The body is an adaptive machine. When you demand something of it, it will do its best to giv it to you, but it'll take time (as we all know). So if you want it to be able to run, you run and rest and the body works at getting better at running. If you want to build strength, then the body will work on that. If you do both on the same day, then the body will work on adapting to the demands you placed on it last, unless there was quite a period of time between the two workouts (i.e. running in the morning, strength in the evening).
If you can, I would recommend you run on days when you don't do your strength training. If this is not possible, leave as much time as you can between those workouts, and it won't matter which one you do first. The time between, allowing for that body adaptation and recovery, is the important thing.
As far as how you split your strength training; I like a split routine, but sometimes I like to focus on one bit of me that I feel needs particular attention. Again, this is largely your choice and is determined by your aims.

Quite some time ago, during an AMA, I asked a similar sort of questions of @Damer and here is some of the answer:

"This, then leads us to your question: How often should we train and what kind of gap between each type of training are we looking at? Obviously, as you suggest also, part of the answer depends on the level of fitness of the individual. But if we assume that this is not the issue then the gap between training sessions will depend on the intensity of the session itself. Suppose, I run 10km in the morning at 40min flat. And then in the evening I do weights to failure. The chances are that A. I will be too tired in the evening by my super-fast morning run to do much and B. The interval I have left for recovery between the two training sessions is insufficient if I did the time I did in 10km.
A study that dates back to 2008 suggests that there is a ceiling to intensity beyond which no further benefits can be derived. So, if you train for an hour flat-out then upping that to two hours will certainly tire you out but it will not give you twice the benefit you expect. This ceiling to intensity gives us an idea of recovery-time windows. So, if you were to run (for cardiovascular fitness) in the morning you could do strength training in the evening and still get benefits from both forms of activity provided that A. Your running was not super-intense and B. You had plenty of food and 'rest' before you got to the second session. Remember this is all about energy management. That study suggested that 2 - 3 times a week strength training with running in between (or the reverse) produced good results for both.

This interval can be significantly reduced if the workout intensity is lowered. A 2018 study where the workout intensity was constant showed that even when the training is specific (i.e. only strength or only cardiovascular fitness) the inadequate rest leads to decrease in performance not an increase. This had also come up in an earlier study that looked at strength training in older adults and found that two-three times a week was more effective at building strength than say, ever day. So adequate rest is important and/or as we often do with Darebee programs, we vary the intensity from one day to the next and reduce it to minimal levels during "active rest" days so that you can keep on gaining day after day.

Finally, the last part of your question is a variation of the first half. If we throw more goals in the mix: train at the same time for speed, strength, endurance etc what will happen? Well, without sports or movement specificities in mind we end up achieving little of what we expect as our body faces competing demands for the energy necessary to power the adaptations we seek. If we are sports-specific however (football, rugbly, martial arts) then the training we do is geared to that and it doesn't matter a lot if we pack everything in. The chances are that we are training hardest for what is most important in the sport and no sport demands 100% output in every physical attribute. Martial Arts, for instance, demands we are flexible, fast and strong but flexibility and speed trump strength (because it's power that counts) so we end up doing less strength-orientated exercises anyway. "

I hope this helps.
Hi and thank you for your detailed reply, it really helped. So If I get it correct is for the best to alternate between days when I run and days when I do workout?

For example my routine could look like this (haha I really like for things to have order):

Mon: Active stretching
Tue: Workout
Wen: Run
Thu: Workout
Fri: Run
Sat: Workout
Sun: Run

Also do you think I could try to do full body workouts one week and the try the split routine the next one and see what works?

Anyway thank you once again for your reply. 😁💪
 

TopNotch

Well-known member
Ranger from Australia
Posts: 1,780
"Motivation is temporary. Discipline is forever."
A routine is good. It means you don't have to think about what you're doing, you just do it.
Yours looks good. You might like to add a bit of a stretch after your runs, too.
Again, what workouts you choose depends on what you want to achieve. Right now, I'm doing the PPL programme and that's fun, but I need variety. Another alternative you might consider is using one of the training plans.
 

kandy

Well-known member
Honeybee Posts: 164
I think your routine looks fine. It's similar to the 8 weeks to 5k structure, except that it has a 4th running day after the 3rd. But 8 weeks to 5k builds from a beginner's starting point, which is probably much less intense than your training, and very gradually.

Like @TopNotch says, it depends on your goal, and having one makes everything better. I suggest split routine because you can train more intensely with each body part. I would also have a rest day between a running and a lowerbody day if I were you.

Because abs can be trained more frequently, you can mix it with upper- or lower-body day(s). Maybe pick an upperbody workout that also have ab exercises on upperbody days, same with lowerbody, or an extra micro abs workout on those days. Of course you can go for a full-blown abs day like your initial plan, but I will have it following a lowerbody day so your legs have a day off before you run again.
 
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Ralad72

Member
Assassin from Czech Republic
Posts: 10
"Nothing is true, everything is permitted."
I think your routine looks fine. It's similar to the 8 weeks to 5k structure, except that it has a 4th running day after the 3rd. But 8 weeks to 5k builds from a beginner's starting point, which is probably much less intense than your training, and very gradually.

Like @TopNotch says, it depends on your goal, and having one makes everything better. I suggest split routine because you can train more intensely with each body part. I would also have a rest day between a running and a lowerbody day if I were you.

Because abs can be trained more frequently, you can mix it with upper- or lower-body day(s). Maybe pick an upperbody workout that also have ab exercises on upperbody days, same with lowerbody, or an extra micro abs workout on those days. Of course you can go for a full-blown abs day like your initial plan, but I will have it following a lowerbody day so your legs have a day off before you run again.
Thank you for reply, so you are saying it would be good to have leg day than day for abs and than a running day? Or that I would have only 2 workout days if I understand it right that would has some abs work in it and it would leave me with 2 rest days?
 

Ralad72

Member
Assassin from Czech Republic
Posts: 10
"Nothing is true, everything is permitted."
A routine is good. It means you don't have to think about what you're doing, you just do it.
Yours looks good. You might like to add a bit of a stretch after your runs, too.
Again, what workouts you choose depends on what you want to achieve. Right now, I'm doing the PPL programme and that's fun, but I need variety. Another alternative you might consider is using one of the training plans.
I kinda like the PPL program, but I don't really know how would I do it alongside with running?
I also never understood If the Darebee programs are meant to be done without complete rest days or not.

Maybe I could keep the same schedule like I have now but change the workout in my workout days for workouts from PPL program.

But it would take longer to finish it like this and I don't know if that would be a problem since I would only make 3 days from the program a week (or maybe I could do the abs on rest days?)
 

kandy

Well-known member
Honeybee Posts: 164
Thank you for reply, so you are saying it would be good to have leg day than day for abs and than a running day? Or that I would have only 2 workout days if I understand it right that would has some abs work in it and it would leave me with 2 rest days?
Yes.

With the 2 rest days you can have one of them training whatever you like, if you prefer. Of course plan wisely, not two consecutive days of the same type of workout.

With stretching, if you do the harder stuff or a long session you can feel like you are done after one workout. If it's just the regular ones you can do them way more frequently.
 
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TopNotch

Well-known member
Ranger from Australia
Posts: 1,780
"Motivation is temporary. Discipline is forever."
Darebee programmes are designed to be done as they are, without additional rest days. There are often active rest days incorporated if required.
Okay, I'm doing the 8 Weeks to 5k running programme and I do the running in the morning (and I run Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday). On non-running days, like today, I might do some other cardio, like cycling or hiking. I do PPL in the afternoon, together with challenges and other workouts. This gives me only about 4 hours between which... well, I'd rather it were a bit more. Twice a week, I get two hours between the afternoon strength workouts and my formal martial arts training. It kind of works. I'd probably get greater gains in one or the other if there were more time between for recovery, but...
Season 8 Tns GIF by THE NEXT STEP
 

Ralad72

Member
Assassin from Czech Republic
Posts: 10
"Nothing is true, everything is permitted."
Darebee programmes are designed to be done as they are, without additional rest days. There are often active rest days incorporated if required.
Okay, I'm doing the 8 Weeks to 5k running programme and I do the running in the morning (and I run Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday). On non-running days, like today, I might do some other cardio, like cycling or hiking. I do PPL in the afternoon, together with challenges and other workouts. This gives me only about 4 hours between which... well, I'd rather it were a bit more. Twice a week, I get two hours between the afternoon strength workouts and my formal martial arts training. It kind of works. I'd probably get greater gains in one or the other if there were more time between for recovery, but...
Season 8 Tns GIF by THE NEXT STEP
So you saying I could do PPL program (everyday) and add running 3 times a week and I'll be fine? (I also have only 1 time window for sport a day so I would probably do the ppl and the go running afterwards right?)
 

TopNotch

Well-known member
Ranger from Australia
Posts: 1,780
"Motivation is temporary. Discipline is forever."
So you saying I could do PPL program (everyday) and add running 3 times a week and I'll be fine? (I also have only 1 time window for sport a day so I would probably do the ppl and the go running afterwards right?)
I do that, but as I said, I am able to do the programme some hours after my running. Now, there's nothing wrong with doing them close together, but you might not get the gains you're hoping for. If you tire your legs with PPL before you go running, you might not run so well. BUT - you can always switch days around a little (your run or the programme), so that on your running days, you're not doing the Legs part of the programme. Tired arms may also have a negative impact on your running, but not as much as tired legs. That could be a fine workaround. :) The programme has two arms days followed by an abs day then a leg day.
 

Damer

Administrator
DAREBEE Team
Warrior Monk from Terra
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 669
I also never understood If the Darebee programs are meant to be done without complete rest days or not.

All Darbee programs have active rest days built-in where intensity is modulated so recovery can take place. You just need to follow the program. :LOL:
 

HellYeah

Well-known member
Posts: 1,123
I have this bad quality of overthinking everything, which leads to feeling bad about it and end up in doing nothing. So if anyone has any tips wha to do with this, I would be very glad.

Ok, I can totaly relate to that... i am working to get away from that habit, too.

Depending on the goals, I would set a focus on one of the "disciplines". Maybe alternating every other month, if you wanna do both. If it is running, I would set a plan for running and fill the days between with fun workouts or stretching, following the mood I am in. Or with a darebee program.

When doing PPL I would run on abs day, because it is before the incoming leg day.
That way you end up with alternating 2 and 3 runs per week...

That would be my way.

There are a thousand ways to setup a routine... If you are feeling bad about 999 of them, because they are not perfect... you'll miss a lot of fun. 😉
 
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